Preparing for Spring with the Help of Asian Medicine, Part 1

Yasmin Spencer, LAc, DAOM

  Preparing for Spring with the Help of Asian Medicine

photo2[1]A Five Element View:

In preparing for spring it is important to begin with an understanding of how each season affects every other.  Our sense of balance, as we go into the spring, is intricately connected to whether or not we took the time to rest in the winter (restore, be still, and go inward).  Spring is associated with new growth and expansion–the time when the seeds begin to sprout and push upward to the sun with force.  Likewise, there may be escalated agitation in individuals as the springtime inspires the urge to move forward and grow after the encapsulation of winter.  New growth is dependent upon the rejuvenation of our deeper sources that occurred in the winter.  Spring is associated with the liver in Chinese Medicine and with the emotion anger.  The liver energy, when balanced, smooths our emotional energy.  The…

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Preparing for Spring with the Help of Asian Medicine, Part 2

Yasmin Spencer, LAc, DAOM

Preparing for Spring with the Help of Asian Medicine, Part 2

…Continuation of Part 1:

Liver Patterns:

When the liver energy is in balance we are able to make decisions and follow through with our creative visions.  This is a great time of year to begin new projects.  When the liver energy is deficient we may lack the ability to make decisions or follow through with them.  On the contrary, when this energy is excessive we may become “work-aholics,” so determined to accomplish our goals that we neglect our needs or our personal relationships.

Physically, this is a time to assess the health of our nails, tendons and eyes.  Nails should be strong and smooth with good color; not brittle or grooved.  Tendons should be supple, flexible and strong.  The eyes should be clear and bright, without yellow or red in the whites.  Emotionally we can assess our health by witnessing if we are…

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Reoccurring Colds, Chronic Bronchitis and How Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine Can Help, Part 1

Yasmin Spencer, LAc, DAOM

Reoccurring Colds, Chronic Bronchitis 

and How Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine Can Help, Part 1

There are many reasons that the lungs become susceptible to sickness. The lungs often become weak due to damage caused by a serious illness, especially if the illness was never completely resolved. Many people report that they were rarely sick, until they got one bad cold or flu, and now they are sick often. This is because the integrity of the lung tissue was compromised through the illness causing a person to be prone to reoccurring sickness. A Chinese medicine view is that the “Qi” of the lungs and the “Wei Qi” defense was damaged, causing the lungs to be vulnerable to external pathogens. There can also be lung weakness in individuals who have or have had asthma, had a serious illness when young, were exposed to toxic environmental pollutants or molds that damaged the lungs, or…

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Reoccurring Colds, Chronic Bronchitis and How Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine Can Help, Part 2

Yasmin Spencer, LAc, DAOM

Reoccurring Colds, Chronic Bronchitis 

and How Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine Can Help, Part 2

Chronic bronchitis, which is a tenacious cough with phlegm that is deeply-seated in the lungs (at times with concurrent infection), can also be caused by lung weakness due to the reasons mentioned above.  More often, however, this sort of cough is due to inappropriate diet, lifestyle, and/or treatment of a cold or flu. It is important to avoid raw or cold foods/drink, as well as to avoid dairy, wheat, and sugar when sick.  These foods create more phlegm and can prolong a sickness. If the individual already has a cough with a lot of phlegm and they consume these foods, it can potentially create more dampness that further lodges the phlegm into the lungs.  Smoking while sick can also deepen phlegm into the lungs, damage the lung tissue, and make a person prone to reoccurring sickness…

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